Egg-cellent Natural Dyes for Your Easter Eggs

easter eggs

Coloring some eggs for Easter this year? The fewer chemicals we consume, the fewer chemicals end up in our environment and bodies, so here’s some info on how to skip chemical dyes and make the switch to natural.

If you want to do natural dyes the easy way, look for plant-based dye at the grocery store, box store or online. It’s no longer hard to find!

Here’s how you know if the dyes you’re looking at are really natural:

  • They will contain ingredients that are the names of plants or plant extracts, such as beet juice, spirulina or turmeric.
  • They won’t contain any ingredients that are the names of primary colors, such as red, blue or yellow. These are called FD&C colors and they are synthetic, man-made dyes.

If you want to get even more into natural Easter egg dyes, make your own! Watch this video from Kitchn to learn how, or check out their written recipes.

And don’t forget: Whether you’re going with real eggs or plastic eggs this Easter, remember to look up proper disposal instructions in our Recycling Guide.

 

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How to Repair a Tear in Leather or Faux Leather

leather bag

Oh no! You’ve got a tear in your favorite leather jacket — or maybe it’s your leather bag. Good news, you might be able to repair it. Watch this quick instructional video to find out how to repair small tears in leather or faux leather.

Hazardous Waste Collection Facility For SAFE Disposal

The Hazardous Waste Collection Facility is for safe and legal disposal of UNUSABLE or UNWANTED hazardous products. Please remember to pack products carefully so they won’t mix or spill. Transport in trunk if possible. The facility accepts all types of hazardous waste except: Radioactives • Explosives • Ammunition.

For highway safety, there is a legal limit of 15 gallons or 125 pounds of hazardous waste per trip.

hhw facility

Open Every Friday & Saturday from 9AM – 4PM

Info valid as of March 20, 2020. Please note that facility operations could change due to the COVID-19 emergency – check naparecycling.com for up-to-date info.

HOUSEHOLDS: No appointment required / No charge Napa County & City of Vallejo households only

BUSINESSES: Napa & Solano County businesses that generate less than 220 lbs. or 27 gal. of hazardous waste per month may be eligible to use the “Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator” program at the collection facility. There is a charge for this service. Call (800) 984-9661 for information & appointment.

 

Spring Cleaning with Recycle More

If spring cleaning has left you with unused, out-dated or oversized electronics & appliances… Recycle Big with Recycle More!

Recycle More accepts:

Pick-up is by appointment only. Schedule a pick-up by visiting naparecycling.com/recycle-more or calling (707) 255-5200.

Bill Pay Options

Due to the COVID-19 emergency, our Napa Payment Center at 598 Lincoln Ave is closed to walk-in customers until further notice. There is still a drop box on site for payments, otherwise please use one of these other bill pay methods:

Online Bill Pay
Pay your bill by credit card! Just visit https://naparecycling.com/billpay/ – it’s quick, easy and secure! MasterCard & Visa accepted. Credit card payments also accepted by phone, M–F 8 am–5 pm.

By Mail
Send Check or money order:
Acct # starts with “13” – NCRWS PO Box 187 Rodeo, CA 94572
Acct # starts with “02” – City of Napa MDF Collections PO Box 51015 Los Angeles, CA 90051-5315

 

Covid-19 Recycling FAQs

Here’s what you need to know about disposing of waste from household and workplace cleaning as we all deal with the COVID-19 emergency…

What should we do with cleaning wipes?

Single-use/anti-bacterial wipes should be disposed of in the landfill cart. This includes so-called “flushable” wipes, which aren’t actually flushable and can clog sewer pipes. Certified compostable wipes are the only cleaning wipes that can go in the compost cart.

Are wipes and hand sanitizer containers recyclable?

Yes, the cylindrical plastic cleaning wipes containers can go in the recycling when empty, along with empty soap or hand sanitizer plastic bottles.

What do I do with used facial tissues – compost or landfill?

In general, facial tissues are okay in the compost. However, if you or anyone in your household is sick, used tissues should be bagged and disposed of in the landfill cart.

What do I do with paper towels – compost or landfill?

Paper towels go in the compost cart, unless they have been used with a non-biodegradable cleaner (in which case they should go in the trash).

Should we still place cans, bottles, cardboard and clean paper in recycling?

Yes, keep recycling!

Should we wash used food containers more than usual before placing them in recycling?

Not more than normal – please make sure they are empty and rinsed out as usual.

Where do we toss used plastic gloves and masks?

Disposable gloves and face masks need to go in the landfill cart – they are not recyclable or compostable.

This is the current guidance as of March 20, 2020. As the situation continues to evolve, waste handling measures may change. Be on the lookout for additional information from local health authorities, as well as at www.naparecycling.com and on our social media feeds.

 

Lessons From ‘Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale’

thrift store

In his new book ‘Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale,’ author Adam Minter explores the strange (and big!) world of donated items. From thrift stores in Arizona to used good markets in Ghana, he uncovers the various places where everything we donate ends up.

By following these items across the globe, Minter is taken aback by the sheer volume of goods Americans are buying new, using briefly, and then donating to thrift stores. While donating unwanted goods is an eco-friendly move, buying new, inexpensive, non-durable products is not.

In the spirit of Minter’s book, here are a few ways you can reduce your impact by changing up your purchasing habits.

Want vs. Need

As with nearly everything eco-friendly, less is more. Before you purchase a product, consider if you actually need it or just want it. Often the instant gratification of a purchase wears off quickly, leaving you with less money and more unwanted stuff.

Buy Used

Used products do:

  • Save you money
  • Support the local economy

Used products don’t:

  • Require new resources
  • Generate additional pollution
  • Need energy to be created
  • Have additional packaging

Together, these factors make buying used substantially more eco-friendly than buying new. So the next time you need to buy something, consider checking your local thrift store or online marketplace to see if you can find what you need secondhand.

Buy Durable

Can’t find what you’re looking for secondhand? Consider purchasing a durable, well-made product that will last. Oftentimes, buying a slightly more expensive product that functions better and lasts longer is less expensive — and more eco-friendly — in the long run.

COVID-19 Information & Service Updates

cleaning wipes

Service Updates | Safety Updates | FAQs | General Info

Service Updates

Here’s what you need to know about our services and disposing of waste from household and workplace cleaning related to  COVID-19.

  • Garbage, recycling and compost collection is an essential public service and will continue as normal.
  • Our facilities are also currently operating as normal.  City (NRWS) bulky item coupons will be re-issued once the Stay-At-Home order is lifted.
  • Our Napa Payment Center is closed to walk-in customers until further notice, so please contact us via phone or email for service questions.  NRWS/NCRWS customers will not have their collection service suspended for late payment during the emergency. 
  • If you need to modify your service level due to COVID-19 impacts, please contact us for assistance.

Safety Updates

To keep our employees and customers healthy and safe, Napa Recycling has adopted a full Pandemic Plan, which includes:

  • All employees are provided masks and gloves and follow CDC guidelines on their use.
  • Every driver, equipment operator, mechanic and scalehouse attendant is supplied hospital-grade disinfectant to spray down their equipment pre- and post- usage. Managers have disinfectant and are spraying all common areas multiple times throughout the day.
  • To protect our recycling sorters from any virus present on boxes or containers, all recycling is dumped out of the truck and left to sit for 3 days before being processed.
  • We’ve closed breakrooms, discontinued physical punchclocks, and requiring social distancing by moving to virtual meetings and remote work for non-operations staff.

FAQs

As we all wash our hands and clean our houses and workplaces, here are some general FAQs:

What should we do with cleaning wipes?
Single-use/anti-bacterial wipes should be disposed of in the gray landfill cart. This includes so-called “flushable” wipes, which aren’t actually flushable and can clog sewer pipes. Certified compostable wipes are the only cleaning wipes that can go in the compost cart.

Are wipes and hand sanitizer containers recyclable?
Yes, the cylindrical plastic cleaning wipes containers can go in the recycling when empty, along with empty soap or hand sanitizer plastic bottles.

Where do we toss used plastic gloves and disposable masks?
Disposable gloves and face masks need to go in the landfill cart – they are not recyclable or compostable.

What do I do with used facial tissues – compost or landfill?
In general, facial tissues are okay in the compost. However, if you or anyone in your household is sick, used tissues should be bagged and disposed of in the gray landfill cart.

What do I do with paper towels – compost or landfill?
Paper towels go in the compost cart, unless they have been used with a non-biodegradable cleaner (in which case they should go in the trash).

Should we still place cans, bottles, cardboard and clean paper in recycling?
Yes, keep recycling!

Should we wash used food containers more than usual before placing them in recycling?
Not more than normal – please make sure they are empty and rinsed out as usual.

I’m cooking more at home since I’m sheltered-in-place – should I keep putting food scraps in the brown compost cart?
Yes, please compost all food scraps and food-soiled paper with your yard trimmings!

I have a lot more plastic bags and plastic film packaging from online shipments – can I recycle it?
No, please place plastic bags and plastic film packaging in the landfill cart – it’s not recyclable and tangles in our equipment.

Can I still purchase your organic compost for my farm or garden?
Yes, and we deliver! See details on our compost page.


COVID-19 General Waste Handling Info:

Household Waste

The CDC determined the COVID-19 virus is not a Category A infectious substance, therefore solid waste from households that is or is suspected to be contaminated with the virus can be managed as it would be for the flu. In an abundance of caution, generators should ensure waste bags are tightly closed and curbside containers are not overfilled so the lids close completely. Please notify us (or your local hauler) if you know or suspect your waste is contaminated with the COVID-19 virus. Remember to wash your hands thoroughly after dealing with any objects you suspect could be contaminated.

Business Waste

Solid waste from commercial generators may also be managed as normal unless directed otherwise by the local health department. Again, to the extent possible, generators should ensure waste bags are tightly closed and containers are not
overfilled so the lids close completely. Please notify us (or your local hauler) if you know or suspect your waste is contaminated with the COVID-19 virus. Remember to wash your hands after dealing with objects you suspect could be contaminated.

If your business needs to modify service levels during this emergency, contact us to help.

As the situation continues to evolve, waste handling measures may change. Be on the lookout for additional information from local health authorities, as well as on this site and via our Facebook and Twitter feeds.

Unwanted Sports Equipment? Sell or Donate It!

soccer ball

Do you have unwanted sports equipment taking up precious space in your closet or garage? Here are a few ways you can clear out some space and get your gear to someone who will get it back out on the field!

Don’t Recycle

While you may be tempted to try to recycle your used equipment, you shouldn’t. Sports equipment is almost always made out of mixed materials, making it impossible to recycle. In addition, putting these items in the recycling can be damaging to equipment and dangerous for workers at recycling facilities. Instead, try selling or donating used sports equipment that’s still in usable condition. Broken equipment that can’t be reused goes into the garbage. One notable exception is sports clothing, which can be recycled through our Recycle More program.

Sell It

Sports equipment is often quite expensive, which creates a large, active secondhand market. Follow these steps to easily sell your gear:

  1. Determine a fair price. This can be done by researching online or checking out similar items in a used gear shop.
  2. Choose a marketplace. Options include websites such as Craigslist, eBay, Nextdoor and Facebook Marketplace, used gear shops such as Play It Again Sports, or local consignment shops and swap meets.

Donate It

Donating your used sports equipment can be a fulfilling (and super easy!) way to get rid of your old gear. There are many options for donating items, from our local thrift stores to national mail-in programs like Pitch In For Baseball & Softball and Level the Playing Field. Donating your equipment is an eco-friendly option that can empower others to get into sports that might otherwise be inaccessible to them.

Buy Used

Looking to go even further? The next time you need sporting equipment, use the resources mentioned above to find gear secondhand. Save a few dollars and help the environment at the same time. It’s a win-win!

Ask the Experts: What Can Be Recycled With Plastic Bags Through Store Drop-Off?

types of film plastic
recycle questions

Have a tough recycling question?
We’re here to help! Ask the Experts »

Q: I know that plastic grocery bags can be dropped off at certain stores for recycling. What else can I recycle in those plastic bag drop-off bins?

A: Film plastic recycling — often referred to as plastic bag recycling or store drop-off recycling — was developed to deal with the massive quantity of plastic bags being distributed at stores prior to California’s recent statewide ban. Plastic bags and other film recyclables cannot be recycled curbside because they get tangled up in the machinery at recycling facilities, endangering workers and halting the recycling process. Never put plastic bags or film in your curbside recycling bin.

Luckily, there are store drop-off locations and they can take more than just plastic grocery bags! Here’s what you can recycle in store-drop off bins:

Here are a few common items that can’t be recycled in store drop-off bins:

All items must be clean and dry to be recycled. Dirty and/or wet bags can contaminate the whole bin and keep it from being recycled.

Film plastics are recycled into new bags, packaging, or even into durable home products, such as composite lumber used to make decks and benches.

Ready to recycle your film plastics? Find a location near you.